What should we teach kids about money?

A long time project idea has finally become an action!

Don’t you love when that happens???

The project is intended to provide a fun, engaging, interactive session to help teach kids about money.

Not just about how to make a lot of money, but how to have a healthy relationship with money.

In our society, there is a spectrum of extremes in our relationships with money: from getting into a pile of consumer debt; to hoarding every last dime; to chasing money at the peril of our relationships, our integrity and even our own happiness.

This project idea came to fruition with the help of the Rockstar Community Fund, which challenges individuals to use $20 to make a difference in their community.

So, the idea was, why not use $20 to entice high school kids to actually attend a workshop on personal finance, while also teaching them about giving back, and requiring them to each give $10 back to a good cause…? Bingo!

So, with the support and collaboration of the Rockstar Community Fund, run by Nate and J. Money, “The School of Rock Your Money: Mo Money, No Problems” was born.

What Biggie probably meant is that “Mo Money, Mo problems” is more about being flung into stardom. However, it is important for kids to know that for the average person, more money, usually means less problems and more freedom:

  • Freedom from living paycheck to paycheck.
  • Freedom from defining ourselves by the car we drive or the label we wear.
  • Freedom to have more quality time with family.
  • Freedom to live a life of purpose and meaning.
  • Freedom to enjoy giving back time and money generously.

So, what does this workshop look like? [Note: This is a very, very condensed version of a 90 minute workshop.]

What is Money, anyway? It is a man made concept. It doesn’t grow on trees and you won’t find money on the periodic table of elements. (What would that look like anyway: Mo?) It is called currency after the word ‘current’, meaning ‘to flow’. At this point, each kid is given a wad of cash: two (2) five dollar bills and ten (10) one dollar bills

What if you can’t buy back timeThis is a hard concept for kids, because they know they have their whole life ahead of them. The kids are taught that the wage on your paycheck is not your true hourly wage and they are walked through the process of deducting taxes, commuting time and job related costs to figure out a true hourly wage. So, the next time they go buy something, they should consider how much time they will have to spend away from their favorite people and activities to pay it off. And, determine if the loss of their time is worth the value of the product and the long term ‘costs’.

Would you like to make $1,000 per hour? This discussion includes entrepreneurship, residual income, real estate investing, side hustles, and the idea of working toward the goal to stop trading an hour of time for an hour of pay. The concept of building residual income to cover basic expenses is the financial freedom break even point. They are given an activity to think of ways to turn $20 into $40, in just one week.

Would you rather buy the Air Jordan shoes or the Nike stock? This is a discussion about net worth, assets, liability, depreciation, appreciation, ROI and compound interest. Activities included calculations using standard big purchases like homes and cars and comparing it to rental homes, stocks and other investments, while factoring in risk assessments. Most kids here know about the net worth of celebrities, from the tabloids, but rarely from their parents or neighbors.

What are your dreams? It was emphasized to never give up on dreams, passion and purpose. Most successful people have setbacks often before meeting their big goals. Don’t let anyone tell you that your dreams are dumb. They are each given another dollar bill to make ‘money art’. They are to draw and write anything that inspires them and they are to place this inspiration somewhere where they will see it everyday.

pic1.JPG

People over profit. No exceptions. Lastly, we talked about giving back and how fulfilling it can be. Most people will be more successful if they have a greater purpose than just making more money. Love, community and social connection is as much of a human need as food, water and shelter. Money won’t hug you when you need it. Money is to be respected, people are to be loved. They are given an activity to come up with business ideas for making money, while making meaning.

In closing, the homework is to:

  1. Create a list of short term and long term goals and to review and revise often.
  2. Report back on how they gave back their $10 to a good cause and how it made them feel.

The first workshop went off amazing. It is hard to impress teenagers, but by the end, the kids were completely motivated and inspired and they said that they would definitely recommend this workshop to their friends.

They wrote thank you letters to Nate and Jay at the RCF (see pictures below) and they also said:

  • Activities were fun.
  • They learned concepts that haven’t been taught to them.
  • Time went by fast.
  • Their generation needs this.

If you want to learn more or hold your own workshop, email RCF @ RockstarFinance.com or TheRealWorldMBA@gmail.com.

You can also check out this thread on the Rockstar Forum:

http://forums.rockstarfinance.com/t/success-first-personal-finance-workshop-for-youths-was-held/1762/35


So, what would you teach kids about money? Please leave ideas and/or links below.

7 thoughts on “What should we teach kids about money?

  1. Such a great idea! I’m in the process of looking to schedule a similar class for teenagers in my local area. I think it’s important to speak to them about money topics they are interested in and work the basic personal finance principals into it.

    Like

  2. This is so great!!! I remember that you had mentioned this a couple of months ago and to see it in action is awesome!!! I can’t wait to read more updates on this and I’ll definitely check out the rockstar forum!!!

    Like

  3. This was an incredible idea and so good of you to try to connect with even one student. You talked about the real things that matter and tried to connect in terms they would understand. Making things relatable and in terms that make sense to them is how the content sticks. I try to teach my ids as much as possible on saving, spending and smart choices. I hope we both make a difference

    Like

  4. Pingback: Top Financial Independence Articcless From Around the Web 2/7/17 | Excess Cash

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s